How to run Tetris on your Raspberry Pi

This is a simple walkthrough on how to install my Tetris clone, Blocks, on a Raspberry Pi.

On most computers running Debian (or Raspbian in the case of the Raspberry Pi), it’s as simple as clone, compile, run:

sudo apt-get install libncurses5-dev doxygen
git clone https://github.com/mike42/blocks
cd blocks
make
./bin/blocks

If you have any issues running this, then you need to fetch a newer version of GCC, as this needs C++11 support to compule (see last section for instructuins).

But if all goes to plan, you will get something like this in your terminal:

2015-04-tetris

Use the keyboard to control the game:

Move
Right, down, left
Rotate
Up
Drop
Spacebar
Quit
q

Get a screen

Basically any project with graphics can benefit from one of these. Simply add on a TFT shield, such as PiTFT to create a tiny console:

2015-04-tetris

Of course, this is still keyboard-controlled, but with some hacking, I’m sure you could map touch events to keyboard actions.

Troubleshooting: Update GCC

The Raspbian spftware image which many Raspberry Pi’s have is slightly too old to compile Blocks, which requires C++11 support.

Luckily, it’s very easy to upgrade from wheezy to jessie to add it. You know you need to do this if you get this error compiling:

$ git clone https://github.com/mike42/blocks
$ make
mkdir -p bin
g++ src/main.cpp src/blocks_game.cpp src/blocks_shape.cpp -o bin/blocks -lcurses -lrt -std=c++11 -Wall
cc1plus: error: unrecognized command line option ‘-std=c++11’
cc1plus: error: unrecognized command line option ‘-std=c++11’
cc1plus: error: unrecognized command line option ‘-std=c++11’
Makefile:2: recipe for target 'default' failed
make: *** [default] Error 1

Generally this means you don’t have GCC 4.8, which is not available in wheezy edition of Raspian.

$ g++ --version
g++ (Debian 4.6.3-14+rpi1) 4.6.3
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

So to summarise this thread, you need to:

nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Find this line:

deb http://mirrordirector.raspbian.org/raspbian/ wheezy main contrib non-free rpi

And change the word “wheezy” to “jessie”:

deb http://mirrordirector.raspbian.org/raspbian/ jessie main contrib non-free rpi

You can then update everything with:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

You are now running the newer jessie release, which gives you access to the GCC 4.8 package we need:

apt-get install g++-4.8

So we can pick up where we left off, and compile the game:

make
./bin/blocks

I blame tetrads!

Tetrad nets

If you play too much Tetris, then you should check out the new subpage: The Tetrad Corner. It’s a collection of things I’ve made this week about the shapes used in tetris (‘tetrads’).

The original idea was that it would be cool to have a tetradic phone password. That is, your password makes a Tetris shape on the keypad. I was bored enough this week to actually write a little script for it, along with a PHP class for rotating the blocks, rendering them as a HTML table, etc.

It turned out alright, but fearing that I had begun something as time-consuming as tetris itself, I banished it to a single-page sub-site. The source code is there if you want those crufty HTML-tetrads on your site: (I don’t!)

Crufty HTML-generated tetrads

Now what I do want is a few tetris blocks for my desk, so I made up some nets to print out and cut up. Now I can make a small paper Tetris game! (PDF linked to image above). Neat huh?

A tetris game in the palm of my hand!

Update 12/4: I built these shapes today. There were two tabs missing on the nets (fixed!), so I cheated by using sticky tape. Click to enlarge the cheesily-colourised image.